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Chemistry

CHEM 117


General Chemistry 2 and Qualitative Analysis


Course Description

This course is the second course in a traditional one-year general college chemistry program and includes the study of kinetics, solution equilibria, solubility equilibria, hydrolysis, electrochemistry, coordination compounds, thermodynamics and qualitative analysis. A brief introduction to organic chemistry and quantitative analysis is also included. Laboratory work correlates with lecture and stresses the identification of common cations and anions by semi-micro methods.

Prerequisites

(A requirement that must be completed before taking this course.)

  • CHEM 111 with a grade of 2.0 or better or consent of department.

Course Competencies

Upon successful completion of the course, the student should be able to:

  • Calculate equilibrium constants and reactant/product concentrations relating to various chemical equilibria.
  • Differentiate between Arrhenius, Bronsted/Lowry and Lewis definitions of acids and bases.
  • Measure the pH of a solution using a pH meter and acid/base indicators.
  • Write balanced equations for acids, bases and insoluble solids dissolved in water.
  • Write balanced equations for reactions between acids and bases.
  • Calculate the hydrogen ion, hydroxide ion, pH and pOH of strong and weak acids and bases, salt solutions, buffer solutions and mixtures of acids and bases.
  • Interpret titration curves.
  • Calculate Ksp and molar solubility for slightly soluble solids.
  • Calculate molar solubility for slightly soluble solids in the presence of common ions or complexing agents.
  • Determine the effect of pH on the solubility of a solid.
  • Determine concentration, reaction stoichiometry and chemical formulas from titration data.
  • Calculate reaction rate and reaction order from kinetic data.
  • Determine the rate law for a reaction mechanism.
  • Explain the relationship between a reaction mechanism and a balanced equation.
  • Explain the ways in which concentration, temperature, surface area and catalysts affect reaction rates.
  • Identify by experiment, cations and anions present in various unknown compounds or mixtures.
  • Compare properties of transition metals and main group elements.
  • Explain trends of size, melting point, density, magnetism and electron configuration of transition metals.
  • Relate Crystal Field Theory to the reactivity, magnetic properties, electron configuration and color of transition metal compounds.
  • Write names and formulas for transition metal complexes.
  • Classify groups of substances as geometric isomers, constitutional isomers, optical isomers, identical compounds or unrelated substances.
  • Draw constitutional, geometric and/or optical isomers for a given chemical formula.
  • Calculate delta H, delta S and delta G values for chemical changes given a table of standard values.
  • Relate delta H, delta S and delta G values to the equilibrium constant and spontaneity of a chemical reaction.
  • Determine reaction enthalpies using a calorimeter to collect the necessary data.
  • Apply the concepts of oxidation reduction chemistry to various systems including electrolytic and galvanic cells.
  • Determine the concentration of a solution using spectroscopic data.
  • Apply a working knowledge of laboratory safety, including proper use of safety equipment (e.g. protective eyewear) and safe work habits.
  • Utilize laboratory equipment in the performance of laboratory experiments.
  • Organize laboratory data, calculations and analyses in an accurate and detailed fashion.
  • Execute appropriate disposal procedures for the various compounds used in the laboratory.
  • Demonstrate interpersonal communication and group work skills while cooperating with other students to complete laboratory experiments.

Course Schedule

Currently no sections of this class are being offered.


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