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Metallurgy and Materials Science

MET 280


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Credit Hours

(3-2) 4 Cr. Hrs.

Section Start Dates


Section NoStart Date
114970January 12, 2015

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Special Problems in Materials Science


Course Description

Students having adequate backgrounds in this discipline and/or catalog specified prerequisites are encouraged to select a topic associated with metallic or non-metallic materials, related processing, new developments or analytical techniques, and conduct investigations to identify problems, analyze data and make decisions. The results of such evaluations will be presented and reported in a systematic, critical scientific format. Scientific methods including literature search, laboratory evaluations and experimentation are encouraged. Likewise, faculty-directed study will be provided.

Prerequisites

(A requirement that must be completed before taking this course.)

Course Competencies

Upon successful completion of the course, the student should be able to:

  • Utilize both written and verbal communication to research into a specific topic in the field of metallurgy and materials science.
  • Conduct an effective literature review to acquire supportive information to help formulate a hypothesis.
  • Investigate multiple sources to create an original hypothesis.
  • Formulate a hypothesis using theory and models to support all scientific investigations.
  • Analyze problems and data based on laboratory investigation.
  • Use a laboratory notebook or electronic word processor to effectively journalize data obtained during laboratory studies.
  • Design an experimental plan to test original hypothesis.
  • Perform the experimental plan.
  • Organize the results from the experimental plan.
  • Interpret results obtained from the experiment.
  • Compare results obtained in the experiment.
  • Write an applied research report.
  • Compose visual materials to emphasize laboratory data specific to the student-selected project.
  • Compose a presentation display board to convey the logic used to prove or disprove the original hypothesis.
  • Defend a logical oral presentation, based on laboratory data to an audience consisting of an Industrial Evaluating Team, Faculty Members, Guests and Students of Metallurgy and Materials Science.
  • Recommend areas for future study, based on student laboratory data, to help define unanswered questions that may prove relevant to future areas of similar student studies.
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